From the Students: Christian University at Gardner-Webb

Gardner-Webb's Christian foundation is important to students
in unique ways. Hear from current students about what it means to them.




Jonathon Rhyne, Freshman Marketing/Journalism

“I know that on my bad days, I am loved by a bunch of people who I don’t even know… Here, people do care about you, and they don’t even have to know your name.” (More)


 

 

Hannah Ray, Sophomore English

“Everything falls under that umbrella of 'Why are we doing this?' and a Christian University has the responsibility to do it because they’re trying to glorify God in all that they’re doing.” (More)



 

Jeremiah Hamby, Senior Psychology

“It’s more than going to Church on Sunday; it’s living in a community of Christian believers in everyday life and being intentional, being vulnerable with them, and the atmosphere at Gardner-Webb has really shown me that…” (More)

 

Caitlyn Brotherton, Senior ASL

“That’s what college is all about: figuring out what you want to do and who you want to be, and when everyone around you is pointing you towards Christ, it’s a lot easier to be focused on him.” (More)

GWU School of Education Graduate Programs Help Student Grow as a Leader

Curriculum and Instruction

Katrissa Fisher (’14)

Katrissa Fisher (’14)

“I have strengthened my leadership capabilities from a plethora of newly obtained knowledge about implementing change, adult learning theory, instructional practices, and assessments, just to name a few topics. Most importantly, I have developed the confidence to pose questions about my concerns as a graduation coach to administrators, district level staff, and even people at the state level.”

Urged by her principal to pursue an administrative degree, Katrissa Fisher (’17) of Winterville, N.C., decided to attend an information session about Gardner-Webb University.

“After a discussion with the Gardner-Webb rep, I knew I wanted to attend,” Fisher reflected. “I chose the Master of Arts in Executive Leadership Studies program, because I was executing administrative duties as part of my job responsibilities, but I did not have the credentials. After completing the Master of Arts, I chose the Doctor of Education in Curriculum and Instruction, because I felt it was the missing component of my educational knowledge.”

Fisher has been a graduation coach at South Central High School in the Pitt County (N.C.) School System for seven years. Before that, she taught middle school students for 15 years. She believes the requirements of the GWU master’s and doctoral programs have helped her grow into an effective leader. “The readings and assignments allow candidates to become familiar with current research and then to actually put that research into practice,” she asserted. “I have strengthened my leadership capabilities from a plethora of newly obtained knowledge about implementing change, adult learning theory, instructional practices, and assessments, just to name a few topics. Most importantly, I have developed the confidence to pose questions about my concerns as a graduation coach to administrators, district level staff, and even people at the state level.”

She also feels comfortable collecting and analyzing data and using it to identify strengths and gaps. “I know how to conduct research to determine which best practices can address the gaps,” Fisher affirmed. “I have also learned how to devise action plans, implement them, and evaluate them for effectiveness. My studies helped me understand how to analyze student data and address student needs. My job focuses a lot on building relationships with families and students, and my studies showed me how those relationships promote overall student improvement.”