From the Students: Christian University at Gardner-Webb

Gardner-Webb's Christian foundation is important to students
in unique ways. Hear from current students about what it means to them.




Jonathon Rhyne, Freshman Marketing/Journalism

“I know that on my bad days, I am loved by a bunch of people who I don’t even know… Here, people do care about you, and they don’t even have to know your name.” (More)


 

 

Hannah Ray, Sophomore English

“Everything falls under that umbrella of 'Why are we doing this?' and a Christian University has the responsibility to do it because they’re trying to glorify God in all that they’re doing.” (More)



 

Jeremiah Hamby, Senior Psychology

“It’s more than going to Church on Sunday; it’s living in a community of Christian believers in everyday life and being intentional, being vulnerable with them, and the atmosphere at Gardner-Webb has really shown me that…” (More)

 

Caitlyn Brotherton, Senior ASL

“That’s what college is all about: figuring out what you want to do and who you want to be, and when everyone around you is pointing you towards Christ, it’s a lot easier to be focused on him.” (More)

Christen Mackorell (’17) has Received Honors for Service, Leadership

Physician Assistant Studies

Christen Mackorell

Christen MacKorell, MPAS '17

“I originally chose GWU for its faculty to student ratios and its central location to surrounding cities. All of the faculty have open door policies and are easily accessible through texts, calls, and emails. This has been critical to my success in the program.”

Christen MacKorell, class president of the Gardner-Webb University Physician Assistant (PA) Studies Class of 2017, is the first PA student ever to be accepted into the North Carolina Medical Society's Leadership College through the Kanof Institute for Physician Leadership.

As the recipient of the Suzanne Nichols Community-Based Project Grant through the North Carolina Academy of Physician Assistants, MacKorell helped to establish a screening clinic at a local homeless center.

The opportunity to serve patients — whether in a homeless shelter or a medical office — is one of the reasons she chose the PA profession.

“I desired a health care position that would allow me to significantly contribute to the patient’s care through a diagnostic process in hopes of notably influencing patient outcomes while still having the flexibility to invest my time and skills in a manner that would meaningfully affect my local community and communities abroad,” she shared. “Frederick Buechner wrote in Wishful Thinking, ‘The place God calls you to is where your deep gladness and the world's deep hunger meet.’ Buechner’s words ring true for me, and I strongly believe that my passion to become a PA and serve my local community and communities abroad is the intersection where my joy and the world’s needs meet.”

MacKorell says the didactic year has been the most challenging of her academic career.

“Even so, I am amazed at the mental conditioning I have developed through the rigorous curriculum and I am encouraged through each lecture as we begin to assimilate the necessary knowledge to become competent providers,” she added.

The GWU program has met and exceeded her expectations with a faculty that graduated top of their class and have extensive clinical experience. In addition they are advocates of their professions and have active roles in local and state medical societies.

“I originally chose GWU for its faculty to student ratios and its central location to surrounding cities,” she explained. “All of the faculty have open door policies and are easily accessible through texts, calls, and emails. This has been critical to my success in the program. In a curriculum that moves so quickly, it is important to not get behind in the modules and the faculty does an excellent job of making themselves available to students when they need additional assistance. The school’s location contributes to the diverse clinical experience in that most of our clinical rotations are within an hour of the University, yet remain diverse in patient populations and levels of care.”